X-MAS Milkshake Shot

So, yes it’s way to early to start wanting it to be Christmas, but now that the year is more than half over I’m due to start work shopping cocktails for my annual party. I got the idea for this layered drink way back in March and scribbled the idea down on a sticky note. I can’t explain it beyond that too much really. One day I just woke up and the recipe was in my head.

Using what I already know about layering and proportions I some how managed to create the perfect layered shot on the first try! This I will end up making in batches with the several tall double shot glasses I have and I have no doubt in my mind that it will quickly become the centerpiece cocktail for this year’s party.

I’m calling it the X-MAS Milkshake Shot, as right after finishing it I could only think one thing, “That tasted like a damn good milkshake!” Obviously with a shot it’s hard to give detailed tasting notes since it’s gone so quickly, but I feel the name says everything. On the nose you get the head of vanilla from the flavored vodka, and it’s creamy and smooth from start to finish. When you’ve gulped it down you can only think of a perfectly chilled milkshake so it’s best to make these in advance and serve COLD!

Alcohol Taste Rating: 5.5/10
Overall Rating: 9/10

X-MAS Milkshake Shot

Layer ingredients in order into a Tall Double Shot:
1/2 Fill Glass with Dark Creme de Cacao
1/4 oz Green Creme de Menthe
1/2 oz Irish Cream
1/4 oz Vanilla Vodka

Layer by carefully pouring over the back of a bar spoon. Chill. Serve Responsibly.

XmasMilkshakeshot
“My milkshake brings EVERYONE to the yard.”

The Lusty Lady

So, earlier today I was digging through my recipe book, looking for something else when I came across the recipe for “The Lusty Lady.” It was a featured cocktail on the back of a sampler pack of bitters, and given the elegant design of the cocktail I decided it would be worth featuring here on the blog…and it does not disappoint!

Though the recipe isn’t a super easy one in it’s execution, it is a good test of the home bartender to give a little extra class to a simple gin based recipe. Now in advance this cocktail calls for an egg white, and subsequently a dry or reverse dry shaking method. Although it is perfectly safe to consume egg whites in cocktails as the alcohol kills off any latent bacteria, it is worth noting that if it bothers you, you might want to pass this one by.

That said this is an impressive and deceptively simple cocktail. Any drink with egg white is going to create a nice foamy head and be velvety smooth on the tongue and this drink certainly fills that standard out nicely. The texture is extremely light and smooth from start to finish. The aroma is mostly blocked by the egg white foam, but there is a slight hint of the lavender bitters that comes through. It begins with simple and sweet tastes, but without a lot of distinguishing flavors, it then moves to a warm gin on the mid palette, and finishes with a slight hint of citrus and lavender with very little burn. Do note that I opted for an American Gin, which is significantly milder and than a traditional London Dry or Ginever. With that change up you can expect an earthier and more pronounced flavor to come through across the entire cocktail.

This is simply an OUTSTANDING cocktail, and with fresh ingredients it really takes a simple recipe to a new level. If you’re looking to impress a friend or date (with restaurants being closed) this will certainly do the trick.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 3/10
Overall Rating: 9.5/10 (Could be higher with a London Dry)

The Lusty Lady

2 oz Gin
1/2 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Simple Syrup
1/8 oz (A bar spoon) Cranberry Juice
1 Egg White
2-3 Dashes of Lavender Bitters
2 Cherries

Shake all ingredients without ice for 8-10 seconds to emulsify egg. Add ice and shake for an additional 15 seconds to chill. Double Strain into a chilled coupe glass, and garnish with two cherries on a pick.

thelustylady
“Oh, whoa, whoa, she’s a lady!”

Spirit Review: Wigle Bourbon

So, I am simultaneously proud and embarrassed that the “kick off” 2020 post is not a cocktail, and is taking place as late as July! I’ve been meaning to get back to posting cocktails at the very least monthly, but things have routinely gotten in the way this year. Most notably was the COVID-19 pandemic, which shuttered liquor stores in my native Pennsylvania for a solid month and a half. That closure quickly depleted my regular stock of spirits and liqueurs and I’ve been slowly building back to a (smaller) working set.

One particular spirit however that I got the chance to try by ordering directly from a local distillery was “Wigle Pennsylvania Straight Bourbon.” Now I was at first taken aback by the name “bourbon” as I as well as many lovers of the spirit (including my cocktail book) mistakenly thought (think) that bourbon has to be made in Kentucky. However, despite the bulk of the American spirit being produced in KY, that is not the case. Unlike other regional favorites such as Scotch, Irish Whiskey, Tequila, or Champaign,  The legal definition of a Bourbon is a spirit distilled from at least 51% corn with a combination of grains including wheat, barley, and rye. It cannot be distilled beyond 160 proof, and cannot be bottled at any less than 80 proof. It also must be aged in NEW charred oak barrels at no more than 125 proof. Outside of those specific stipulations it just has to be produced in the United States…and that’s it.

Ok enough Bourbon lessons, onto the spirit. From my native city, Wigle Whiskey crafts a 92 proof (46% ABV) spirit that is sure to catch the attention of even the most die hard bourbon purist. It’s smokey and sweet on the nose hints of cinnamon. Those hints become more pronounced the more you sip as it permeates your senses.  The spirit starts smooth and sweeter leaning toward fruitier flavors but quickly moves to a stronger smoky oak with an intense burn on the back end (with hints of caramel). This isn’t you’re grandfather’s bottom shelf bourbon either. At between $40-55 for a standard 750mL bottle, it’s an investment in a local craft distillery, with the flavor and complexity of an even more significantly pricier product.

Overall it’s nothing spectacular, but it is great choice if you’re looking to step up your game with a Manhattan or an Old Fashioned. I would avoid using it for more complex or juice based mixes though or else the flavor will easily get lost among your mixers. Pick up a bottle if you’re feeling a little adventurous, but do note that you can get similar tasting bourbons for much less.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 9.8/10
Overall Rating 8/10

WIN_20200702_17_42_53_Pro

Blue Christmas

Well I decided I better come back for at least once cocktail before the end of the year. The “Blue Christmas” I created specifically for my annual party, and based the color/title off of the old Elvis Presley Song of the same name. I went through a couple iterations creating the drink, but settled on potato vodka and the highlight special ingredient Rosemary Simple Syrup.

Base presentation is key here. A stemless cocktail glass makes for a short easy to hold but elegant designed drink. As the name suggests it’s a bright blueish/green cocktail, garnished with a lime wedge for some seasonal green. On the nose you’re greeted with mild citrusy notes. The palette on first sip is where things get interesting. If you go with a potato vodka (vs wheat like Absolut or a corn like Titos) you’ll get smooth refreshing start, which quickly moves to a sweet rosemary and vermouth flavor, and finishes with a slightly sweet and sour citrus from the lime. If you opt for a different vodka, you’ll likely get a little more burn on the back end. Either way this is a very easy drinking cocktail for your seasonal parties. If you’re less of a vodka fan and want to push the juniper flavor out more, I’d highly suggest trying the same recipe with a London Dry Gin such as Bombay or Beefeater!

Alcohol Taste Rating: 6/10
Overall Rating: 8.9/10

Blue Christmas

1 1/2 oz Vodka (Can also use Gin)
1/2 oz Dry Vermouth
1/4 oz Blue Curacao (Increase to 1/2 if you want it bluer)
3/4 oz Lime Juice
3/4 oz Rosemary Simple Syrup*
Lime Slice

Shake all liquid ingredients with ice. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Float a thin lime slice on top.

*Rosemary Simple Syrup – Boil 1 cup of water with 2 large springs of rosemary for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add 1 1/2 cups of sugar. Stir until dissolved and pour into a clean glass jar. (Optionally add the boiled rosemary springs into the syrup for further maturation of flavor) Refrigerate once cool.

“I’ll have a blue Christmas without you”

Blackbeard’s Curse

So after a long break from posting new cocktails I’m back with a new MoM original that I’ve been making for a majority of the year. Blackbeard’s Curse highlights two main ingredients Rum and Bitters, in this case it has to be Bittercube Blackstrap in order to make the flavor just right. Visually you’re looking at a cloudy dark rum, brightened up with the lime wedges floating in the drink and on the nose are hints of lime, vanilla, and cinnamon. On the palette you’re greeted with a sweet lime flavor which moves quickly to the blend of rum and bitters giving you a molasses, nutmeg, cinnamon vibe. It finishes with a little burn as it’s still pretty much just straight Kraken on ice but it’s a refreshing punch with the lime making a sour comeback near the end.

I created this as a simple drink for after work, and it’s become a new favorite rather quickly. For a long hard day keep the recipe as is, but if you’re looking for a slightly sweeter variant substitute in 1/2 oz simple syrup or 2 teaspoons of superfine sugar in place of the cubes. Outside of that pick up your blackstrap bitters and enjoy!

Alcohol Taste Rating: 8.8/10
Overall Rating: 9/10

Blackbeard’s Curse

2 oz Kraken Rum
1/2 Lime, cut into wedges
2 Sugar Cubes
3-6 Dashes Bittercube Blackstrap Bitters

In an old fashioned glass place 1/2 a lime cut into 4 wedges. Toss in 2 sugar cubes and give a healthy douse of bitters. Muddle together until sugar is well incorporated. Top with ice and add rum. Stir well.

blackbeards curse
“Yo ho, yo ho, A pirates’ life for me!”

Side by Side: Canton Ginger and Bols Ginger

For today I’ve got another side by side review of two liqueurs. Bols Ginger and Domaine de Canton Ginger. Both are ginger liqueurs designed for a variety of cocktails, and have similar flavors but very different nuances and price points.

We’ll start with the Bols (since I have more of it at the time of writing). The liqueur has a strong ginger aroma similar to ginger beer and is virtually colorless. At 24% ABV it’s the heavier of the two in its sugar content, but it makes up for it with an intense bite of ginger flavor especially at the back end. Early on you’re mostly hit with a sweet sugary flavor and some interesting caramel notes. Overall it’s not a bad flavor additive, but you won’t be drinking it straight. At around $13-15 it’s a resonable price for the flavor needed for certain cocktails. I’ll give it a solid 7/10 overall.

Next is the Domaine de Canton. A french style ginger liqueur at a slightly higher 28% ABV. Side by side there is a noticable color difference in that the Canton is slightly gold in color. There is still a bit of ginger on the nose, but it’s much less pronounced and considerably sweeter smelling. It also feels slightly (but just barely) thicker in viscosity as when you swirl it in the glass it will temporarily coat its inside walls. The like the aroma the ginger flavor is more subtle mixing in hints of vanilla and possibly some orange notes. The biggest advantage for the Canton that I can see is the lack of a harsh ginger flavor burn at the end. It’s a smooth drink from start to finish and extremely well rounded! However at around $33-35 a bottle it’s going to be something for your extended bar rather than a daily mixer. That said I’ll give it a solid 8.5/10 overall. Despite the higher price point, you’re looking at a reasonably priced product that could easily be served over ice, or with a nice pairing of dry vermouth or gin.

At the end of the day however the two products are very different but also a little the same. For some cocktails I think the Bols could make an easy substitute especially in recipes calling for 5 or more ingredients. However, if you’re looking to put a simple twist on your martini, don’t skimp on the cost for the more premium product, it’s worth every penny!

 

WIN_20190531_18_11_50_Pro

Spirit Review: Pine Creek Whiskey

While I was out at the store recently I found myself thinking about Canadian Whiskey, and how my regular mixing brand has been Canadian Club for many years. However it’s a fairly basic and easy to come by garden variety bottle, and I was looking to switch it up for my restock. When I saw the uniquely shaped bottle of the Pine Creek and the word “rum” on the label I decided to have a closer look.

Pine Creek Canadian Whiskey is a 42 proof 10 year aged whiskey with a finishing age in rum barrels. I found this very interesting as I’ve had rum aged in whiskey barrels, but not the other way around. Additionally their first aging in traditional oak is specifically not in climate controlled storage offering an extra level of complexity between each batch, and at a reasonable $24.99 I was pleasantly surprised.

On the nose you’re warmed with oak with some caramel notes so nothing out of the ordinary for a general whiskey. However the flavor profile is another story. On the front end it’s very sweet, mid palette hits you with a traditional oak which reminds me a lot of a Bourbon, and on the finish creeps in warm molasses. There’s still a little finishing burn, but that’s to be expected with any spirit, and this product doesn’t pull any punches in that regard. The rum barrel finish that you get in the flavor is very mild at full strength, but I imagine with a little vermouth this could make an excellent Manhattan!

Overall it’s certainly not your garden variety Canadian Whiskey, instead it’s almost a “Canadian Bourbon,” which for me is a welcomed change. I don’t know if it’s good enough for me to switch to it as my regular, but if you’re looking for something a little different than your basic bottle, consider picking up one of these.

Overall Rating: 7.5/10

DSCF8262
Caribbean influence, eh?

Desert Healer

The Desert Healer (also called Desert Cooler) is a refreshing cocktail and a great welcome back to posting here on the blog! After a (semi) dry 40 days I’m ready to share some great new recipes with all of you.

With temperatures continuing to rise as we reach closer to the middle of spring the Desert Healer will treat the wounds from those unseasonably hot days. The drink has a unique “sandy” color, it’s not the most appealing but the orange garnish certainly helps with that. The drink begins with a mild citrus and ginger on the nose. With the first sip you’re greeted with a little ginger, followed by a hint of gin, then a nice finish of citrus and mild cherry. As it settles you get a little more of the ginger beer fizz to round things out. Overall it’s a very mild drink without a ton of overpowering alcohol burn or biased flavors. It’s a great choice for a hot summer day, but not a day that you want to sacrifice on quality.!

Alcohol Taste Rating: 5/10
Overall Rating 8.4/10

Desert Healer (Cooler)

1 1/2 oz Gin
1/2 Cherry Brandy (Cherry Heering Preferred)
3 oz Orange Juice
3-5 oz Ginger Beer
Orange Slice

Shake juice and liquor ingredients with ice. Strain into an iced highball or collins glass. Top with ginger beer stir gently. Garnish with an orange slice

VARIATION: Add an extra 1/2 oz of Cherry Heering after stirring for a gradient effect and sweeter finish.

DSCF8261
“…Where it’s flat and immense
And the heat is intense…”

Fire Nation Flaming Rum Punch

Let’s get one last cocktail recipe in before Lent shall we? I’ll be taking these 40 days before Easter to sober up and give my liver a break, but for today it’s party time! For today’s cocktail I’m finally ready to share the third cocktail in the Avatar Universe drink set. The “Fire Nation Flaming Rum Punch” is a kick in the gut in it’s intense volume of alcohol, but a wonderfully balanced mix of flavors similar to that of a classic Zombie.

The Flaming Rum Punch is a spectacle of color and real fire! If done correctly you’ll be able to ignite the cocktail and for your guests turn cinnamon into sparks with your fingertips. When the fire is out and the glass’ rim has cooled you’re greeted with a toasty cinnamon aroma and an inviting red-orange color. The first quarter of the drink is super intense as you sip off the layer of 151 rum, which hits hard but with a toasted cinnamon flavor with a simple fruity mix underneath. After you’ve gotten through initial shock layer, you’re left with a complex rum punch recipe. The drink starts sweet, moves to a smokey cinnamon on the mid palette with a little falernum and citrus creeping at the back end, and finishes with a “PUNCH” of rum on the back end with a sweet fruit tail as it sits.

Much like it’s predecessors in the series, this cocktail isn’t to be taken lightly. It kicks you from front to back, but is sweet enough to not be overpowering. Overall it’s a fun drink to pull out for a party, but not something I’d make everyday. If you’re got a well stocked bar, you might want to give it a try.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 8.5/10 (then 7/10)
Overall Rating 8/10

Fire Nation Flaming Rum Punch

3/4 oz Sloe Gin
1/4 oz Grenadine
1/2 oz Falernum (or 1/4 Orgeat, 1/4 Lime Juice, pinch of clove, pinch of ginger)

3 oz Orange Juice
1/2 oz Sweet/Sour
1 oz Spiced Rum
1/2 oz Gold Rum
1 oz Dark Rum
3/4 oz 151 Rum
Powdered Cinnamon

Shake everything except 151 with ice. Strain into a highball or pint glass (no ice). Float 151 rum over the drink. Ignite. Sprinkle powdered cinnamon over as desired. Blow out flame and enjoy.

fnfrp cocktail
“Everything changed when the fire nation attacked!”

Valentine

So I’m fairly embarrassed that the first cocktail of 2019 is in the middle of February, but I’m proud to finally be a day a head of a holiday for releasing a drink. This should give everyone the day to snag the ingredients if you don’t already have them.

Consulting a cocktail book of mine I was intrigued by this simple, but interesting cocktail. A visually simple light rose color, with an inviting nose of a light banana and tart berry. The drink starts off sweet with a mix of the flavors, hits with a banana and light vodka burn on the mid pallete, and finishes with the tartness of cranberry. I fell like this is a cocktail that could really be changed based on your choice of ingredients. A sweet banana liqueur will make a sweeter drink, while a stronger 99 Bananas will get you a punchier cocktail with less flavor and more burn. Additionally a cheaper vodka would make this drink more harsh than smooth and complex, so if you’re making it for a lover spend the extra cash and get a nice top shelf vodka.

Overall it’s a simple but interesting cocktail. Inviting in color and flavor, but not complex enough for the experienced mixologist to call a “regular.” If you’re looking to impress, but still keep under a budget this might be a good choice. Outside of that, I think there are better options for these three flavors.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 6.5/10
Overall Rating: 7.5/10

Valentine Cocktail

2 oz Banana Liqueur
1 oz Vodka

3 oz Cranberry Juice

Shake and strain into a wine glass (no ice).

WIN_20190213_20_28_14_Pro
“Won’t you be mine?”