Au Currant Sidecar

Today we’ve got a tasteful and tasty spin on the classic sidecar recipe. Although given your working set of ingredients you may have to substitute here and there (as I did).  I want to start by highlighting my use of a VSOP Brandy in place of Metaxa (a Greek Brandy with a stronger “winey” flavor). You MAY be able to use both Brandy and some Sweet Vermouth to achieve a similar flavor to the Metaxa. The former being much easier to find than the later depending your your location, and that difference will give you a slightly different flavor profile. In addition my use of Cassis Syrup over Creme de Cassis will make my overview of it lean sweeter than it would be normally. A common variation also calls for Chambord rather than Creme de Cassis.

So, I love this drink for 2 main reasons. First is the use of the sugar rim (which is something I wish I saw in more cocktail recpies); and second is the incredible finish that keeps you going back for more. With its deep red color, you’re greeted with an incredible forward aroma of what almost smells of agave nectar. With a sip from the sugar rim you begin with a sweet and simple flavor, move to a subtle currant and lemon, then finish with a richly sweet and oaky finish. The finish is what really caught my attention with this drink. Early in your sip is just feels like a fruity sweet drink, but the complexity of the oak from the brandy to the subtle orange of the Grand Marnier makes this damn near perfect! I do with there was more to the front and mid palette here, but I’m willing to compromise for something this good!

Alcohol Taste Rating: 7/10
Overall Rating: 9.8/10

Au Currant Sidecar

1 1/2 oz Metaxa (or VSOP Brandy)
1 oz Fresh Lemon Juice
1 oz Orange Juice
1/2 oz Creme de Cassis (or Chambord)

1 oz Grand Marnier
1 tsp Superfine Sugar
Granulated Sugar
Lemon Wedge
Lemon Twist

Rub the edge of a cocktail glass with the lemon wedge and rim with granulated sugar. Shake liquid ingredients and superfine sugar with ice (approx. 15 seconds). Strain into prepared glass. Garnish with a Lemon Twist.

Au Currant Sidecar

“Au Perfection!”

New York Sour

Today’s cocktail is a whiskey sour variant with a really interesting look! The New York Sour, is a very interesting name for a drink that builds on the classic whiskey sour but adds…red wine to it? That’s right, and it really delivers!

This is an impressive cocktail both in flavor and in visual presentation. The mysterious and inviting red float over the gold whiskey sour makes serving it a true pleasure in and of itself. The aroma mostly of your red wine with subtle citrus notes. Like with any layered cocktail the flavors come in multiple parts. For the first half of the drink you’ll experience a wine with a whiskey sour finish, and the second half of the drink will be a classic whiskey sour with a unique fruits element.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 5/10
Overall Rating: 9/10

New York Sour

2 oz Blended Whiskey
¾ oz Fresh Lemon Juice
½ oz Simple Syrup
½ Dry Red Wine
Lemon Slice

 Shake whiskey, lemon juice, and simple syrup with ice and strain into a chilled sour glass (or lowball). Float ½ ounce of dry red wine and garnish with a lemon slice.

“What’s that floating in the east river?”

Milano

Looking through my recipe book, I’m really shocked I haven’t made this yet. It’s also the first Galliano cocktail here on the blog, and I’m down to the last 1/4 of the bottle. The Milano is a simple, but classy recipe with a wonderful yellow color.

The drink greets you with a pleasant citrus and anise aroma. It’s starts with a very gin forward flavor, moves to a herbal citrus near the mid-back palette, and finishes with a balanced herbal and anise flavor brought by the Galliano. Galliano can be pretty harsh if you’ve never tried it before with it’s vanilla and anise notes, but this drink really rounds it out to make you go back for more. That herbal quality that runs through the whole drink intensifies and the drink sits in your stomach. It’s almost as if the flavor gets better after the first sip.

Certainly worth a try if you have some Galliano, but if you’re not willing to buy it’s obnoxious bottle, feel free to pass it by. Also the choice of a more juniper forward gin and/or a dash of herbal bitters (such as cardamom or lavender) could make this a great aperitif cocktail for guests. Normally I’d add some sort of garnish to a drink like this (on top of the original drink), but the color of this is so spectacular that a garnish would l feel would ruin it.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 8/10
Overall Rating: 8/10

Milano

1 1/2 oz Gin
1 1/2 oz Galliano
1 oz Lemon Juice

Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

milano cocktail

“L’ Autentico”

Frozen Blizzard

Here’s something a bit different to close out “Blended Cocktail Week.”

I realize it might seem a bit redundant to say “Frozen Blizzard” but it it important to note that this drink can be make shaken with ice, or blended with it. The drink also calls for 3 ounces of bourbon or blended whiskey which are two very different categories of whiskey which could shift the drink to either side of the taste spectrum. For this variation I decided to mix both the blended whiskey and the bourbon for a more well rounded taste (and also because my bourbon is 100 proof).

The drink has a strong and unblemished whiskey aroma which to any lover of the spirit is quite welcoming. This unique blended cocktail starts off a little sour, then leaves you with a tart whiskey taste on the mid palette and the finish. I do think the drink lacks a bit of flavor complexity despite the mixing of blended whiskey and bourbon. However, if you’re looking for something to blend that isn’t a vodka or rum based drink, this is well worth the try.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 8/10
Overall Rating: 8/10

Frozen Blizzard

3 oz Bourbon (or Blended Whiskey) [1 1/2 oz of each used]
1 oz Cranberry Juice
1 oz Simple Syrup
1/2 oz Fresh Lemon Juice
Lemon Slice

blended blizzard

“Extra Chilly! To warm you up.”

Combine all ingredients in a blender with 1/2 cup of ice. Pour into a tumbler or wine glass. Garnish with a lemon slice (wheel).

 

Queen Elizabeth’s Wine

Well, at this point I think it’s safe to say that I can’t keep up with last year’s schedule of “a new drink every Monday,” but I will certainly try to keep getting drinks out to you guys. So, you may see a surplus of new recipes over the next week, then a bit of a break. Just remember to check back here occasionally for a new drink or two.

Ok so down to business. Today’s cocktail is certainly of a different caliber than most of the fruit based drinks you’ll find me making. The “Queen Elizabeth’s Wine” is appropriately named for both it’s color and taste. The cocktail’s main aroma comes from the dry vermouth in the drink, but unlike some other vermouth cocktails the flavor doesn’t overpower the drink. You’ll start off with a sweet wine taste (something like a Pinot Grigio), but it quickly moves to the lead liqueur of Benedictine. The finish has a nice mild vermouth taste and keeps you going back for more. It’s a rather small drink and fills a traditional small cocktail glass perfectly, but for a modern variation you could easily bump up the Benedictine to 2.5 oz and the lemon juice to 1.25 with a dash of citrus bitters. Even if you’re not huge on the taste of vermouth, this might be worth a try.

Overall Rating: 8/10
Alcohol Taste Rating: 5/10

Queen Elizabeth’s Wine

1 1/2 oz Benedictine
3/4 oz Dry Vermouth
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
Lemon Twist

Stir and strain with ice into a chilled cocktail glass. Garish with a lemon twist (rub over edge of glass)

Queen Elizabeth's Wine

(Insert generic offensive Queen of England joke here)

Captain’s Citrus Squeeze Punch

Well with a recent restock of my Captain Morgan Original, I was lovingly greeted with a little ad/recipe book on the bottle. While most company designed drinks are iffy at best today’s actually has a nice balance of flavors. A mild citrus aroma paired with some subtle almond undertones makes this a very inviting drink. Granted my substitution of Blue Curacao for the orange variety might make this visually appeal a little strange, but with the right garnish it does come back around. Really the only difference between orange and blue curacao is the color, so it doesn’t change the flavor profiles of the drink with this substitution.

Starting with a smooth juicy flavor it slowly moves to a spiced rum and mild almond finish. It may not be a drink for the menu, but it certainly warrants keeping the little card around to make it again.

Overall Rating: 7/10
Alc. Rating: 2/10

Captain Morgan Citrus Squeeze Punch

1.5 oz Captain Morgan Original Spiced Rum
1 tbsp Orange Curacao (Blue used)

2 oz OJ
1 tbsp Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Almond Syrup

Straight build in a rocks glass over ice. Stir well. Garnish with your choice of sliced or peeled citrus fruit (orange, lemon, and/or mint spring)

captain citrus squeeze punch

“YARG!”

 

Royal Hawiian Cocktail

So yes I am VERY late for the new drink of the week, but I’ve got something very interesting as long as it’s not too late.

The Royal Hawiian matches some interesting flavors together for a decent tropical summer drink. It has a sweet almond aroma with a classy foam top and yellow/cream color. It starts out with a tropical sweet taste, hits the mid palette with a strange almond and gin combo, and finishes on a slight sour note and the mild alcohol burn of gin. It’s use of the almond syrup makes for a unique combo, but I don’t know how well it works together with the tropical flavors of the drink. It is though very much a tiki style drink (which aren’t really my favorite). If you are into tiki drinks this one might be a good one for you to try.

Also note that the original recipe calls for Orgeat Syrup (which is essentially orange blossom water with almond syrup). In most cases though Almond and Orgeat are interchangeable.

Alcohol Taste Rating: 4.5/10
Overall Rating: 7/10
Make it again? Not sure. Probably save it for anyone requesting something Tiki

Royal Hawaiian

1 1/2 oz Gin
1 oz Pineapple Juice
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/4 oz Orgeat Syrup

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass

royal hawaiian

“Watch your language, you’re in front of Royalty.”

Recipe Source: Common Man Cocktails